Daily Event for February 13, 2012   Leave a comment

We are looking for descedants of s.s.”Hermann” crew in US.
The sidewheeler Hermann was built in 1847 by Westervelt & McKay in New York City for the Ocean Steam Navigation Company. She was of wooden construction and had a clipper stem. She was 234′ long and 1,734 gross tons and could make 9 knots in the best conditions. There was room for 188 passengers in two classes, the accommodations were later increased to 340 passengers. Hermann was one of the first U.S. transatlantic steamers. Until 1857 she made the Atlantic her home working the lanes between New York and Bremen, Germany stopping at Southampton along the way.
 In 1858 she was moved to the west coast and by 1866 had been bought by the Pacific Mail Steamship Company and sent to Yokohama, Japan. On February 13, 1869 the ship, carrying over 400 people, was wrecked a mile off the coast of Japan near Kwatzu, Japan with the loss of about 275 lives.
SS Hermann (left) and SS Washington in New York Harbor. Portrait by James E. Buttersworth

 

From MARITIME QUEST http://www.maritimequest.com/daily_event_archive/2012/02_feb/13_hermann_1847.htm

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Posted July 9, 2012 by Capt. Numata in Uncategorized

A former captain of ocean going vessel wish to let many people know that residents in Kawazu helped s.s.”Hermann” and crew under dangerous conditoins.   Leave a comment


We are looking for descedants of s.s.”Hermann” crew in US.
The Sankei Shinbun, a major newspaper in Japan reported as follows;
Website dated 2012.2.11 21:43
— I am sorry for my rough translation. —
Article of the Sankei Shinbun
A memorial service for 22 American victims of the U.S. side wheel paddle steamer which sank off Chiba on February 13, 1869, will be held for the first time by Shinkeiji temple in Katsuura Chiba prefecture on the 13th. Feb., 2012.
It is an end of the result which some residents investigated the details of the accident.
“Hermann” shipwreck which occured 140 years ago, is beginning to be forgotten now. The residents are also continuing efforts to look for a bereaved family, and they are talking “If it can contribute to Japan-U.S. friendship through a memorial service.”
Until now,  memorial services which united also the victims of other shipwrecks  were held the temple in every August.
Well, a side wheel paddle steamer “Hermann” was owned by the U.S. shipping company, and had been engaged in the transportation in Japan.
At that time, the Higo domain hired in order to fight with the their last enemy in Hakodate. 350 persons (soldiers of Higo domain and others) and 80 American crew were on the ship, moreover arms and ammunition and war funds were also loaded.
The ship left the offing of Takanawa (Present Shinagawa, Tokyo).
But, it ran on a rock and sank in the present Kawazu shore, Katsuura city by the terrible rainstorm on the night of 13thFeb., 1869.
The death by drowning and missing were Japanese(200 or more) and 22 American crew. The stone monument was builtin 1878 on the hill where we  can overlook the sea of accident.
This  monument called “Imperial army mound” is designated as the history cultural assets of Katsuura city. However, it was not written in  the monument about 22 American victims.
Capt. Mikio Ono (68 old),   a former  captain of ocean going vessel,  he was interrested in this shipwreck by knowing informatins from an underwater archaeologist after his moving to Katsuura.
At his move, he got to know the shipwreck and American victims at first.
He began investigation of the shipwreck, saying “It is pitiable not to be known at all, although those American crew were involved in the civil war of the foreign country, Japan.”
Although he asked some related shipping companys for detailed informations, but he could not find.
After he looked at the picture scroll of the shipwreck found lately,  in which stranding and rescue activities were drawn, he wished to investigate thoroughly.
He said “If my investigations becomes an opportunity which lets many people know that Japanese people helped the American ship and crew under dangerous conditoins.”
He consulted with the persons concerned in Kawazu,  and arranged opening a memorial service for the victims of both Japanese and American victims on the 13th of this month, when is same month and day of the shipwreck.
He is going to invite the bereaved family of soldiers of Higo domain to a memorial service. He plans to appeal for participation also to the American persons concerned after next year.
(Yasuto Tanaka)

Posted July 9, 2012 by Capt. Numata in Uncategorized

The picture scroll of s.s.”Hermann”  shipwreck was found lately in Japan.   Leave a comment

We are looking for descedants of s.s.”Hermann” crew in US.
The following is an article in THE JAPAN TIMES’ OVERLAND MAIL. dated Feb.24, 1869 .
In this, I  inserted four images. These images are in the picture scroll which Mrs. Miyuko Sato owns.  She lives in Kumamoto Prefecture, southwestern part of Japan.
Her great-grandfather who was on board s.s.”Hermann” at the shipwreck of 13th Feb., 1869.It seems that the requested painter made specially to draw a tragic situation after her great-grandfather’s coming back alive.
The situation of stranding and rescue activities were drawn in the scroll on 42 cm in width, and 6 meters in length.
The scroll of s.s.”Hermann shipwreck found lately in Japan
THE JAPAN TIMES’ OVERLAND MAIL. Feb.24, 1869
LOSS OF THE P.M.S.S.Co.’s STEAM-SHIP”HERMANN”
[AUTHORIZED STATEMENT BY CAPTAIN NEWELL]
THE JAPAN TIMES ‘OVERLAND
dated Feb.24. 1869
“I was ordered to take command of the Hermann as noon as that vessel should return to Yokohama from Yedo, and did so on the morning of the 13th inst. There were then on board 350 passengers and a crew of 80 men.
“The heavy southwesterly gales which had prevailed for 24 hours previously, had broken; the wind had veered to N. and E.and the barometer indicating better weather, I proceeded to sea at noon, bound to the Straits of Saugar. Outside of Cape Sagami we encountered a heavy Southwesterly swell but wind fresh from N. and E. Passed the breakers on Mila ledge about six miles distant at 4 30 P.M., and then steered N.E. by E. 1/4 E. one hour; then E.N.E till 7 P.M.; then steered E. by N. 1/4 N. the ship making  7 knots per hour against the strong wind. These courses shoud have taken the ship about 8 miles from the land of Kawatzu, but I supposed the heavy S.W. sea would set her on shore, and therefore thought the distance from land might  be about 5 miles.  The second officer was stationed forward  in the bows on the look out. The night was extremely dark and hazy; so that I saw land very indistinctly and altered the ship’s course to the Eastward in the manner related above, to give the point (distance about 75 miles from Yokohama), a wide berth; the native pilot on board having told me that there was a reef off the point, although its existence was not indicated on the chart, nor mentioned in the sailing directions.
Hermann was fighting
with the heavystorm.
I steered this course E. by N. 1/4 N. from 7 till 9 o’c1ock. I had then no apprehension whatever, and had just been aft to the standard compass to examine the course made by it, and was going forward again when I discovered breakers port bow, and immediately after saw ahead. I then ordered the helm “hard port.” The ship at once answered  the movement of the helm, but was caught by a. tremendous roller and thrown with great violence upon the rocks, striking forward and then aft, when raised by the following swell. Successive seas breaking upon the ship with great violence forced her over the reef, the water filling the ship, meanwhile, rapidly.
The vessel thus drifted shore, the sea breaking outside of her till she had settled fairly upon the bottom and to the hurricane deck; this was about 1 o’clock A.M. She had by this time broken open amidship; the bows were stove in, and the hull more or less broken by the foremost. I concluded at once after strìking that it was safest for the people to cling to the wreck : as no boat could live in the breakers about us, and I ordered that the boats should not be lowered. The life preservers, of which there was a great number, were got up, and the passengers shown their use. I threw up some signal rockets, when the people on shore lighted fires in little bay in which the town of Kawatzu is situated. At 10 30 the port boats were swept away, two of them being at once swamped alongside. Some of the crew jumped into the third one and got clear of the wreck, but it was overwhelmed close by. Soon after I had the starboard boats lowered which were quickly filled with people. In two of them they cut the painter and attempted to reach shore, but were swamped at a short distance from the wreck. The third and last boat cast adrift from the vessel, but remained under the cover tile wreck afforded from the breakers, for about half an hour and then went in towards the shore. As the wreck settled deeper, the people came upon the hurricane deck.
Hermann was wrecked
off Kawatzu
Between midnight and 1 A.M. one of the funnels fell upon the king rods, and thence rolling forwards upon the hurricane deck, broke it off amidships, causing loss of life to number of people collected there. Before the chimney fell, the foremast had gone. The sea reaching the hurricane deck, broke up the whole of it forward, but the after portion floated off almost entire and remained in this way alongside and seemed  to save 40 or 50 people. We then collected on the wheel house and in the rigging. The wind sea moderated rapidly, the former veering to the Sd, and Wd. and coming off  the land very cold and piercing. Some of the people were washed  off; some tried to save themselves on pieces of the floating wreck. The boats being metallic lifeboats, although swamped, still floated and were washed  into the small bay by the surf, and those persons who clung to them were saved.
“It is impossible for me to estimate the loss of life. The ship first struck the reef at 9 P.M. and had not settled, so that the sea dashed and broke up the hurricane deck till about 1 A.M. and those who were swept away in the various casualties happening in the interval, were carried in shore by the surf while floated by the life preservers or by clinging to portions of the wreck. We suffered greatly from the cold and some of those in the rigging proved unable to endure it.
The next day after storm
“At daylight I found the wreck lay about 3/4 of a mile from shore and near the bay mentioned above. The ship struck about 1/4 of a mile further out but was swept by the heavy rolling seas to the spot where she finally settled. I had little hopes from the appearance of the const that those who were in boats during the night were saved; but, as it afterwards proved, many of them were. About 100 people remained on the wreck. Soon one of the ship’s boats and a number of native craft came off from shore. The latter would not come alongside, so that I was obliged to transfer the people from the wreck to them by means of the life boat. When however the weather moderated still more, the Japanese boats came alongside and helped to take off the balance of the people. At 2 P.M. all those who remained by the ship through the night were safely landed on shore.
“Before closing, I would remark that the behaviour of the Japanese was heroic. When the ship struck, these brave men, suddenly roused from sleep by the awful crash, seemed to comprehend their
situation in a moment: no stampede; no disorder: from the first they were quiet and cool;  retaining wonderfully their presence of mind, and calmly awaiting the commands of their leader. This officer called them on deck ; and after consulting with me as to the proper course to be pursued, ordered his men to stay by the ship.
American and Japanese people
warmed themselves at fire together.
On hearing this, they retired to their rooms, where they remained until driven from them by the water rising in the vessel. None of them attempted to leave the ship without permission from the officer in command ; and I noticed that those who determined to try swimming ashore, stripped themselves, with the exception of a belt about the waist, and fastening to this their swords jumped into the sea.
“On arriving at Kawatzu, we mustered 58 and crew; the first officer * a water tender,+ and 20 other crew having been lost. We walked 60 miles through the country, meeting everywhere with kindness, and reaching the head of Yedo  Bay, obtained the boat which brought us to Yokohama.”
* Mr.Chase. +Mr.White

Posted July 9, 2012 by Capt. Numata in Uncategorized

About Katsuura where s.s.”Hermann” was wrecked   Leave a comment

We are looking for descedants of s.s.”Hermann” crew in US.
About Katsuura
Katsuura Station
Katsuura is located in the southeast part of Chiba Prefecture, and apart  75-km from Tokyo. The city regions face the Pacific coast where the Japan Current going north, and the coastline is rich in the natural scene.
The city is known for a fishery port of bonitos and spiny lobsters as Japanese top class.
Moreover, the scenery of beautiful sands and rias seaside gives a  deep impression on people who visit Katsuura.
bonitos landed
And the morning market which is proud of more than 400 years of history gather many local abundant products, is called Japanese big 3 morning markets. It is crowded with many tourists as a sightseeing spot, and is loved also as supply of civic daily foods.
Basic Information about  Katsuura
Population:20,517 (as of May 31, 2012)
Location: 35° 08′N, 140°12′E
Area   : 94.20 square kilometers
Mayor: Toshio Saruta, Mr.

Posted July 9, 2012 by Capt. Numata in Uncategorized

On the day of “Hermann” shipwreck, it was a terrible storm also in Yokohama.   Leave a comment

We are looking for descedants of s.s.”Hermann” crew in US.
The ship departed from Tokyo bound to “the Straits of Tsugaru” at noon 12th Feb.,1869. She had on board 350 Japanese soldiers , together with a American crew of 80.
The distance to the destination was about 540 miles. The course line estimated  was a black
one of the above map.
Immediately she came out of Tokyo Bay, encountered the storm, and was driffted toward Katsuura by the big swells, and was wrecked on
Point Kawatzu near Katsuura in following day,13th February 1869 namely.
The point of shipwreck was appoxmately the  red x point.
It was about 85 miles from departure or about 74 miles from Yokohama. The day of her shipwreck, it was a terrible storm also in Yokohama.
THE JAPAN TIMES’ OVERLAND MAIL (yokohama, Wednesday, February 24, 1869) reported in details.
THE JAPAN TIMES’ OVERLAND MAIL.
YOKOHAMA, FEBRUARY 24th, 1869
SUMMARY.
On the night before (the 12th inst.) a storm swept over Yokohama which exceeded in violence anything of the sort that has been experienced in the settlement for a long time. The wind, which was from the Southward, had been increasing steadily during the afternoon and evening, until between the hours of 10 and 11 P.M. when it blew a perfect hurricane, which continued with unabated fury till next morning.
Several vessels in the harbour dragged their anchors, but we believe without any damage, either to themselves or others. On shore, however, the effect of the storm were severely felt, tiles and shingles, bricks and mortar hurtl?ng through blue air in all directions.
Several houses in the native town were blown down. In the Xth’s Barracks  a good deal of shingling was blown off the roofs, and many of the unfinished villas on the Bluff suffered considerably.
Part of  the roofing of the Theatre of the Corps Dramatique was blown completely away and the building sustained other damage; in fact, in theatrical parlance, the storm nearly “brought down the house,” altogether. In the morning, the wind shifted round to the Northward and Eastward, and though another blow expected from that direction, happily we escaped it.
As the wind during the night was off shore, but little sea got up in the harbour, which accounts for the shipping escaping damage.
The port is very much crowded, and had there been any sea on, certainly much mischief would have been done.

Posted July 9, 2012 by Capt. Numata in Uncategorized

DREADFUL SHIPWRECK—GREAT LOSS OF LIFE   Leave a comment


(From the Overland China Mail)

The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. ) Saturday 15 May 1869 reported in detail

We are looking for descedants of s.s.”Hermann” crew in US.
We exceedingly regret to announce the loss of the P.M.C.S.S. Hermann. The following is Captain Newell’s account of this accident: — I was ordered to take command of the Hermann as soon as that Teasel should return to Yokohama from Yedo, and did so on the morning of the 13th February.
There were then on hoard 350 passengers and a crew of 80 men. The heavy sonth-weaterly gales which bad prerailed for twenty-four hours previously had broken; the wind had veered to N. and 8., and the barometer indicating better weather, I proceeded to sea at noon, bound to the Straits of Saugar.
Outside of Cape Sagami we encountered a heavy south-westerly swell, but wind fresh from N. and B. Passed the breakers on Mila ledge, about six miles distant, at 4.30 p.m., and then steered N.E. by E. till 7 p.m.; then steered N.E. by E. tE. one hour; then E.N.E. till 7 p.m.; then steered E. by N. £ ST., the ship making about seven knots per hour against the strong wind. These courses should have taken the ship about eight miles from the land at the point of Kawatz ; but I supposed the heavy B.W. sea would set her on shore, and therefore thought the dis tance from land might be about five miles. The second officer was stationed forward in the bows on the look out. The night was extremely dark and hazy, so that I saw the land very in distinctly, and altered the ship’s course to the eastward in the manner related above, to give the point (distance about 75 miles from Yokohama) a wide berth ; the native pilot on board having told me that there was a reef off the point, although its existence was not indicated on the chart, nor mentioned in the sailing directions.
I steered this course E. by N. £ N. from 7 till 9 o’clock. I had then no apprehension what ever, and had just been aft to the standard compass to examine the course made by it, and was going forward again when I discovered breakers ojF the port bow, and immediately after saw them ahead. I then ordered the helm ” hard a port.”
The ship at once answered the movement of the helm, but was caught by a tremendous roller and thrown with great violence upon the rocks, striking first forward and then aft, when raised by the following swell. Successive seas breaking upon the ship with great violence forced her over the reef, the water filling the ship, meanwhile,-rapidly. The vessel thus drifted in shore, the sea breaking outside of her till she had settled fairly upon the bottom and to the hurri cane deck; this was about 1 o’clock a.m. She had by this time broken open amidship; the bows were stove in, and the hull more or less broken by the fore mast. I had concluded at once, after striking, that it was safest for the people to cling to the wreck, as no boat could live in the breakers about us, and I ordered that the boats should not be lowered.
The life preservers, of which there was a great number, were got up, and the passengers shown their use, I threw up some signal rockets, when the people on shore lighted fires in a little bay on which the town of Ka watzu is situated. At 10 30 p.m. the port boats were swept away, two of them being at once swamped. Some of the crew jumped into the third one, and got clear of the wreck, but it was overwhelmed dose by. Soon after 1 had the starboard boats lowered, which were quickly filled with people. In two of them they cut the painter and attempted to reach shore, but were swamped at a short distance from the wreck. The third and last boat cast adrift from the vessel, but remained, under the cover of the wreck afforded from the breakers, for about half an hour, and then went in towards the shore.
As the wreck settled deeper, the people came upon the hurricane deck. Between mid night and 1 a.m., one of the funnels fell upon the king rods, and thence rolling forwards upon the hurricane deck, broke it off amidships, causing loss of life to a number of people col lected there. Before the chimney fell, the foremast had gone. The sea reaching the hurricane deck, broke up the whole, of it forward, but the after portion floated off almost entire, and remained in this way alongside, and seemed to save forty or fifty people. We then collected on the wheel houses and in the rigging.
The wind and sea moderated rapidly, the former veering to the southward and westward, and coming off the land very cold and piercing. Some of the people were washed off; same tried to save themselves on pieces of the floating wreck. The boats, being mostly lifeboats, although swamped, still floated and were washed into the small bay by the surf, and those persons who clung to them were saved. It is impossible for me to estimate the loss of life.
The ship first struck the reef at 9 p.m., and had not settled so that the sea dashed and broke up the hurricane deck till about 1 a.m.; and thoße who were swept away in the Tarious casualties happening in the interval were car ried in shore by the surf, while floated by the life preservers or by clinging to portions of the wreck. We suffered greatly from the cold, and some of those in the rigging proved unable to endure it. At daylight I found the wreck lay about three-quarters of a mile from shore, and near the bay mentioned above. The ship struck about a quarter of a mile further out, but was swept by the heavy rolling seas to the spot where she finally settled. I had littles hopes, from the appearance of the coast, that those who were in the boats during the night were saved; but, as it afterwards proved, many of them were. About a hundred people still remained on the wreck. Soon one of the ship’s boats and a number of the native craft came off from shore.
The latter would not come alongside, bo that I wh obliged to transfer the people from the wreck to them by means of the lifeboat. When, however, the weather moderated still more, the Japanese boats came alongside, and helped to take off the balance of the people. At 2 p.m. all those who remained by the ship through the night were safely landed on shore. Before dosing, I would remark that the be havior of the Japanese was heroic. When the ship struck these brave men, suddenly roused from sleep by the awful crash, seemed to com prehend their situation in a moment. No stampede; no disorder. From the first they were quiet and cool; retaining wonderfully their presence of mind, and calmly awaiting the com mands of their leader. This officer called them on deck; and after consulting with me as to the proper course to be pursued, ordered his men to stay by the ship. On hearing this they retired to their rooms, where they remained until driven from them by the water rising in the vessel. None of them attempted to leave the ship without permission from the officer in com mand ; and I noticed that those who determined to try swimming ashore stripped themselves, with the exception of a belt about the waist, and fastening to this their swords, jumped into the sea. On arriving at Kawatzu, we mustered fifty-eight officers and crew; the first officer, a water sender, and twenty of the crew having been lost. We walked sixty miles through the country, meeting everywhere with kindness ; and reaching the head of Yedo Bay, obtained

Posted July 9, 2012 by Capt. Numata in Uncategorized

Outline of s.s.”Hermann” are as follows:   Leave a comment

According to Palmer List of Merchant Vessels
 
We are looking for descedants of s.s.”Hermann” crew in US.
 
The steamship HERMANN was built for the Ocean Steam Navigation Co by Jacob A. Westervelt & William Mackey, New York, and was launched on 30 September 1847. Original configuration: 1,734 45/95 tons; 234 feet 11 inches x 39 feet 6 inches x 31 feet 7 inches; 1 funnel (short, tucked in between the paddle boxes), 3 masts (bark rig); wooden construction, 3 decks, square stern, billethead, figurehead of Hermann, the Germanic hero; side-wheel propulsion, 2 side-lever engines (Novelty Iron Works, New York), bore 6 feet x stroke 10 feet, 12 psi, 11 revolutions per minute, aproximate ihp 821 (measured in service); diameter of paddle wheels 36 feet, width of floats 8 feet; service speed 9 knots; accommodation for approximately 180 passengers in 1st class; cost $360,000 (Ridgely-Nevitt) / $410,000 (Kemble).
 
The HERMANN was the second of two steamships completed for the Ocean Steam Navigation Co, which had been incorporated in May 1846 to carry the mails between New York and Continental Europe for a renewable term of five years. The mail contract offered two alternatives: (1) the company could build two steamships and send them to Bremerhaven, with two sailings per month from New York, for an annual payment of $400,000, or (2) if, preferred, once all four steamships were built it could dispatch the other two of them to Le Havre, with once sailing a month from New York to Bremen and one sailing a month from New York to Le Havre, for an annual payment of $350,000. The lesser amount of this second alternative was in consideration of the shorter distance from New York to Le Havre.
 
The HERMANN was laid down sometime after the launch of her sister ship, the WASHINGTON, on 30 January 1847, the delay in starting being the result of financial problems, the company being unable to raise sufficient capital to fund her construction. Her intended name was LAFAYETTE, suggesting that the company intended to use her on the proposed New York-Le Havre service. However, she was launched as HERMANN. She was outwardly identical to the WASHINGTON, but was four and one half feet longer, almost a foot broader, and surveyed at 74 tons more; her weather deck was clear except for the wheel house aft and two small houses near the paddle boxes which served as entryways to the cabins below. On the main deck was the Grand Saloon, over 85 feet long, with “family” rooms for four to six passengers installed on the deck below.
 
21 March 1848, maiden voyage, Eleazer Crabtree, master, New York – Halifax (entered in distress, 28 March) – Cowes (arrived 11 April) – Bremen; 600 miles out encountered a storm and for 40 hours lay to, head to sea, making no progress; headrails smashed, part of the overhanging housing of the wheels torn away, and the hull deflected so much that both injection pipes carrying water into the condensers were broken; repaired at Halifax and proceeded. On return passage, sailed from Bremerhaven 19 April, calling at Southampton for further engine repairs; sailed from Southampton 6 May, arriving off Sandy Hook 21 May, but forced to wait 36 hours for the fog to clear before she could come up to her dock; passengers included a dozen camels and two Arab drivers, especially imported from Egypt by the S. B. Howes Circus.
 
The HERMANN made 4 voyages in 1848 and 5 in 1849, most of them marked by mechanical difficulties, a result of the fact that her hull, like that of the WASHINGTON, was insufficiently rigid to counter the weight of the paddle wheels, shafting, and machinery, which resulted in frequent breaking of pipes and shafts. In addition, while the engines were large enough to propel the ship at a respectable speed, the boilers failed to raise sufficient pressure to power them effectively, and what steam they did produce required the consumption of inordinate quantities of coal. 9 October 1850 – 29 March 1851, HERMANN withdrawn from service for modifications; two original boilers replaced by four smaller ones; short single funnel tucked in between the paddle boxes replaced by two much taller funnels, very close together, fore of the paddle boxes; service speed increased to 10.5 knots; bark rig retained, but the main yard usually stowed on deck, giving the rig the appearance of a barkentine.
 
Upon the outbreak of the Crimean War in 1854, France and England began to charter transport to carry men and supplies to the Black Sea. The Cunard Line lost so many steamships to war service that she abandoned the New York half of her operations after December 1854. As a result of the withdrawal of British ships, the Ocean Steam Navigation Co’s Bremen service gained freight and passengers, and 1855 became the most successful year in the line’s history.
However, with the end of hostilities, the chartered vessels returned home, interrupted routes were resumed, and many new services planned. In June 1856, the Hamburg-America Line initiated steamship service between Hamburg and New
York, and in December 1856, a consortium of Bremen merchants founded Norddeutscher Lloyd, ordering four screw steamships of over 2,000 tons apiece, to be placed in service in 1858. On 25 April 1857, the British steamship QUEEN OF THE SOUTH, sailed from Bremen via Southampton for New York. On the American side of the Atlantic, Cornelius Vanderbilt turned from the New York – California trade to the transatlantic trade, and on 16 April 1857 his steamship ARIEL inaugurated his service between New York and Bremen. With revenues declining disastrously as other lines entered the field, and without the funds to replace its aging ships, the Ocean Steam Navigation Co was forced to complete its existing mail contract and to go out of business. 1 June 1857, expiration of the mail contract. 17 June 1857, last voyage, Bremen – Southampton – New York (47 roundtrip voyage completed).
 
31 July 1857, offered for sale together with the WASHINGTON, but because of a severe business depression the vessels were not sold until they were purchased at auction for $40,000 in June 1858 by the newly formed California, New York & European Steamship Co.
23 August 1858, Edward Cavendy, master (and part owner), sailed from New York for San Francisco with over 500 passengers. Capt. Cavendy had only $300 on board to finance the voyage; called for coal at Valparaiso (18 September), Lota, Chile, and Valparaiso (24 October), the purchases made on credit, with bonds on the ship left as surety. At Valparaiso, Capt. Cavendy received orders from New York instructing him to call at Panama, to pick up passengers from the WASHINGTON, which was supposed to stop at Aspinwall on her way to the Pacific. 9 November 1858, arrived at Panama; Capt. Cavendy found no passengers and no news of the WASHINGTON, which he expected to meet. The California, New York & European Steamship Co had failed and had been replaced by an organization of even more dubious integrity, the American Atlantic & Ship Canal Co, whose agent in Panama had no credentials, no funds and a large, unpaid hotel bill. The agent presented Capt. Cavendy with a letter ordering the HERMANN to stop at San Juan del Sur, on the western coast of Nicaragua, to meet passengers on the WASHINGTON, which was to have sailed from New
York on 6 November for San Juan del Norte, on the eastern coast of Nicaragua.
Unable to purchase coal because the freight bill was unpaid, and as part owner of the ship facing financial ruin in New York on account of her debts, Capt. Cavendy left the HERMANN under the command of the first officer, Mr. Patterson, and returned to New York to rescue his situation. Using the coal and provisions still on board, Patterson sailed the HERMANN to San Francisco, where she arrived on 27 November 1858.
 
February 1859, seized at San Francisco by the authorities for her debts and sold by the U.S. Marshal to Capt. George Wright for $40,000; made one trip to the Northwest coast, after which she was said to have been “bought off” by the
Pacific Mail Steamship Co. The HERMANN saw little service on the Pacific, as she was not adapted for tropical service to Panama and was too costly to send on the northern run to the Columbia river. By this time she had lost her bowsprit, clipper bow, and figurehead; the stem was now straight, with a forward rake. Winter 1862-63, made one voyage from San Francisco to Panama for M. O.
Roberts’s People’s Line. 14 August 1866, auctioned off to T. J. L. Smiley for $17,000, and by him sold to the Pacific Mail Steamship Co. 14 November 1866, proceeded to Mare Island, to be refitted for a voyage to Yokohama, where the
Pacific Mail planned to use her as a store ship and spare steamer. 1 March 1867, sailed from San Francisco for Yokohama. Since she was still an operational, a rarity in Japanese waters, it was soon considered more profitable to put her to active use, and in 1868 she was placed in coastwise service, from time to time being chartered as a transport by feudal Japanese authorities. 13 February 1869, en route from Yokohama to the Straits of Sangar, wrecked on Point Kawatzu, with a loss of over half the 350 Japanese troops aboard.

Posted July 9, 2012 by Capt. Numata in Uncategorized